The Real Story of Calamity Jane

The Real Story of Calamity Jane

One of the most enduring myths of the American Old West is that of Calamity Jane. The word “myth” is used because, even though Jane was a real person, very few details of her life can be discerned with certainty. Much of what is known about her early life comes from an autobiography she dictated to a friend, to be sold at Old West museums as an added attraction to them, and Jane was well known for embellishing tales about her life and adventures. She did it on stage during her brief time as a performer before alcoholism forced her out of the entertainment circuit (her only job as an entertainer was to tell tales of life in the Old West), and she did it with those who knew her. Fiction about her was even being written by others during her lifetime. Here is what is known and probably true about the life of the woman known as Calamity Jane.

Calamity Jane was born as Martha Jane Cannary on May 1, 1852, in the town of Princeton, Mercer County, Missouri. The daughter of Robert W. Canary and Charlotte Burch, she was the eldest of six siblings, with two younger brothers and three younger sisters. In 1865, her father moved the family via wagon train to Virginia City, Montana. Her mother died along the way. The remaining family only spent a short amount of time in Virginia City before moving to Salt Lake City, Utah. Her father started farming, but died in 1867, leaving the 14-year-old Martha Jane to raise her younger siblings. She was known for her kindness and compassion and took this duty seriously. She did whatever she needed to do to support her siblings. This meant taking them all to Piedmont, Wyoming to start anew.

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Is Tracing Your Health History Important in Your Genealogy Research?

Is Tracing Your Health History Important in Your Genealogy Research?

Are you interested in discovering more about your family’s health history as part of your genealogy research? Many people get into genealogy these days for that very purpose. It is a particularly common reason for beginning genealogy research among adoptees, but others are interested in it, as well. With the ready availability of affordable DNA testing these days, it is easier than ever to explore the health history of your family, either as the main part of your genealogy research or as an aspect of it. You can go to your own doctor for it, or choose from several companies that specialize in this kind of testing. But how truly important is tracing your family’s health history to your genealogy project? The answer all depends on your own special interests, as well as your family’s ethnic and medical background.

Health History Research as a Hobby

If you don’t belong to an ethnic group that is known for being prone to certain genetic diseases, and if your family does not have a medical history of lots of people getting the same disease over generations, then looking into your health history might just be part of your genealogy research, something you do as a hobby. It is interesting to know what conditions you might be susceptible to, and the knowledge lets you keep on top of getting regularly tested for certain things you might find in your results. It can ultimately make you a healthier person because of this, and by giving you and idea of what the best things would be for you to eat. You can also pass this information down to your kids. This way, they will be armed with the same information as you, and will be even more on top of things if you get the health history of their other parent, as well.

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Genealogy Gold Podcast: #75

AF-075: What Are County History Books and How Can They Help With Your Genealogy?

County history books are usually useful genealogical resources. Here is what you need to know about county history books and where to find them, as well as what information you may find in them.

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